CONFIDENTIAL

No.688

BRITISH / AMERICAN

STALAG IVA HOHNSTEIN

Stalag Commandant

2nd in Command

Arbeitseinsatz

German Doctor

British Chief Man of Confidence

British Chaplain

 

British Medical Officers

 

 

 

 

Accompanying Officer from the

    German High Command

Oberst Kratz

Oberstlt. Menzel

Hptm. Kurz

Oberstabsarzt Dr. Kuehn

Sgt. R. Smith, POW No. 15734

Mr. R.R. DAVEY, British YMCA Secretary,

    POW No. 261050

Capt. H.W. WYKES, RAMC, POW No. 95473

Capt. D.C. CLAY, NZMC, POW No. 228240

    at revier Grube Brigitta

Capt. W.D. LUSK, NZMC, at infirmary

    Wolfnitz-Dresdent

 

Major Schneider

 

---------------

 

Strength of the Stalag

District

Bautzen

Dippoldiswalde

Dresden links

Dresden rechts

Freital

Grossenhain

Hoyerswerda

Kamenz

Koenigstein

Neustadt

Zittau

Stalag main-camp

Lazaret Koenigswartha

Lazaret Schmorkau

Lazaret Elsterhorst

 

British

393

182

471

473

632

210

720

32

195

205

311

42

215

179

126

4386

American

 

 

51

 

148

100

 

 

 

 

 

5

34

28 )

1 )

367

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

please see

separate reports

Total 4753

in 60 British and 7 American Working Detachments.

 

Date of visit: January 22nd. 1945.

 

DISCUSSIONS AT HOHNSTEIN

        A) Chief Man of Confidence

                Before the discussion with the Stalag Commandant, the Delegate of the Protecting Power had a meeting with the Chief Man of Confidence of the Stalag, Sgt. SMITH, where the following points were brought up:

                1) Main-camp

                        The Chief Man of Confidence reported no change in the general lay-out of the main-camp at Hohnstein. Living accommodations, washing and toilet facilities are still satisfactory. At the moment there are 42 British and 5 American Ps.o.W. at Hohnstein. The staff (included in the above number) is formed by:

                        Capt. H.W. WYKES, British Medical Officer

                        Mr. R.R. DAVEY, YMCA Secretary

                        Sgt. SMITH, Chief Man of Confidence

                        2 Medical Orderlies

                        1 cook and

                        8 others Ps.o.W. working for the benefit of their fellow prisoners in this Stalag.

                2) Red Cross Parcels

                        The stock of Red Cross food parcels is very low at the moment. The working detachments are issuing their last parcels. At the Stalag there is a small reserve of 400 food parcels, which amounts to nothing in comparison with the 5000 British and American prisoners in the Stalag area. Red Cross at Geneva was informed of the situation and it is hoped that new supplies will arrive within days.

                3) Medical Attention

                        Capt. H.W. WYKES reported the following medical attention:

                        "I have been working as Medical Officer at Stalag Hohnstein since October 3rd, 1944. There is a Stalag revier of 25 beds, 8 of which are at present occupied by British sick. Serious cases are sent to Koenigswartha, Schmorkau or, in the case of TB, to Elsterhorst lazarets. The usual transport difficulties are met with but so far no serious difficulties have been experienced. Two Medical Orderlies are working in the revier.

                        "Drugs. A fair supply of drugs are obtainable from the German revier and at the moment a good supply of British drugs are at hand.

                        "Visits paid by me to Kommandos. The position here is not as good as it might be. Occasionally I am allowed to visit in the immediate neighbourhood, but not as much as I would like.

                        "Attitude of German Medical Staff. On the whole this is the best I have yet experienced. I am able to obtain help and cooperation of the German Medical Officers in straightening out many difficulties which arise in the various Kommandos in the Stalag.

                        "Medical facilities in the Kommandos. In general this is satisfactory, German M.Os. visiting Kommandos twice weekly. Occasionally difficulties and injustices arise in which case I am notified through this office and am usually able to obtain help from the German Stalag M.O.

                        "Dental Treatment. In the case of Kommandos this is obtained locally, and is satisfactory. In the case of men requiring dental plates, the position is, however, not so satisfactory. These men must first obtain a chit from the local dentist saying they require false teeth, and this must be submitted to the Chefarzt. The men are sent for to the Stalag. Unfortunately there is no British dentist in the whole Stalag."

                4) Clothing.

                        Regarding old prisoners, the situation is fairly good, every prisoner having been supplied with 2 Red Cross outfits. But various difficulties arise regarding the clothing of the recently captured soldiers. Their British uniform is often declared as war booty and taken away, and not always good clothing substituted. Especially the supply with underwear and socks is such, that old prisoners have to give parts of their belongings to the new-comers, as the Detaining Power is in no position to do so.

                5) Religious Activity.

                        There is only one British Chaplain in the Stalag, Mr. R.R. DAVEY. He is allowed to visit the Kommandos and takes advantage of this permission as often as possible.

                        Regarding Roman Catholics it could be arranged that either a French padre is allowed to visit them in the British camps, or that Roman Catholic prisoners can go to French camps to assist in the Divine Services.

                6) American Chief Man of Confidence.

                        The British Chief Man of Confidence gave the information that an American Chief Man of Confidence will be called to Hohnstein to act on behalf of the American prisoners in the Stalag.

                7) Report of Death.

                        Sgt. Smith reported the death of a British P.O.W., killed in the air-raid on Dresden on January 16th, 1945; Pte. Lea NORMAN, POW No. 278986. Address of his next-of-kin and his Reg.No. could not be obtained on the day of visit, but will be transmitted later on.

        B) Stalag Commandant.

                At the end of the tour, the Delegate of the Protecting Power had a long discussion with the Stalag Commandant, Oberst Kratz, where various matters were taken up. The main points were:

                1) Working Detachment No. 1091, Neukirch.

                        The Delegate protested against the living accommodations in this camp and asked the Stalag Commandant to improve the conditions or to transfer the camp. Oberst Kratz promised to inspect the said working detachment. If the manager of the factory did not agree to the necessary improvements, the camp would be transferred.

                2) Pullovers.

                        Bdr. R. PHILLIPS, District Man of Confidence of the Freital area reported that in Spring 1944 80 pullovers, some British Army issue, some received by men in their personal parcels in Italy and some Red Cross issue were removed from British Ps.o.W. in his district for "safe-keeping". With the arrival of cold weather the prisoners asked that their pullover should now be given back. The German Oberzahlmeister refused and told them that the pullovers had already been distributed to prisoners of other nationalities who had none.

                        The Delegate asked the Stalag Commandant  to explain to him why these pullovers were not returned, and why they were at least not distributed among British prisoners. The Stalag Commandant could give no satisfactory reply and promised to make thorough inquiries and to give the Chief Man of Confidence satisfaction.

                3) Some minor points were settled on the spot.

 

---------------

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENTS DEPENDING ON STALAG IV A HOYERSWERDA DISTRICT.

 

District Man of Confidence: Sgt. E. MILLER, POW No. 12919 Strength: 720 British Ps.o.W. in 7 working detachments. When visiting 5 of these working detachments, the Delegate of the Protecting Power was accompanied by Sgt. E. MILLER.

 

Date of visit: January 15th, 1945.

Working Detachment No. 502, GRUBE BRIGITT

 

Man of Confidence: Cpl. F. LUSTACE, POW No. 95613

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        There has been no change since our last visit in September 1944. No military targets lie in the neighbourhood of the camp, which is provided with covered slit-trenches.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        140 British Ps.o.W. including Capt. D.C. CLAY, NZMC, POW No. 228240, acting as British Medical Officer.

        All prisoners are working for the Grube Brigitta, mostly repairing and laying rails or loading and unloading wagons. The amount of daily demanded work is based on 10 hours, but is usually done in 6 hours. The time gained is entirely at the disposal of the prisoners. Every second Sunday is free.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        The living quarters, described in previous reports, as well as lighting and heating, are satisfactory.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        Good, the prisoners enjoy daily hot showers.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        Good.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        The food supplied by the Detaining Power is cooked by German women in the central-cookhouse, whereas Red Cross food can be prepared on two stoves in the camp itself.

        The store-room of Red Cross parcels, unfortunately empty on the day of visit, lies outside the camp. One of the two keys is in the possession of the Man of Confidence.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        Capt. D.C. CLAY is in charge of the small revier of this camp. I [Note: Possibly a Roman numeral to indicate 1] recognised British Medical Orderly.

        Of the 15 patients in the revier none is a serious case, the sickness being boils, influenza and such.

        Medicaments and drugs are mostly supplied by the Reserve-lazaret Elsterhorst. The actual stock is large enough to last one month.

        Serious cases are taken to Koenigswartha, where all operations are carried out.

        Prisoners in need of dental treatment are sent to Elsterhorst, where a French dentist is working in a satisfactory way.

        On the whole, Capt. CLAY gave a good report on the revier, which will gain by the new room still under construction.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        Every man has two complete outfits.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        Laundry is sent out and done by a woman in the village.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        Correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        Only beer is available.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        On rare occasions this camp has been visited by a British padre.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Both, indoor entertainment and outdoor recreation are satisfactory.

 

XIV) MAIL

        Since Christmas mail is stated to be slow. Letters from England take up to 2 months to arrive.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        On October 1944, a YMCA Representative paid a visit to this camp, which was much appreciated by the prisoners.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        The only complaint put forward to the Delegate of the Protecting Power concerned the bad state of the issued blankets. It was promised that as many worn out blankets will be exchanged against new ones, as available.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        Grube Brigitta is a good camp.

 

 

Date of visit: January 15th 1945.

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 1225, GRUBE LOHSA

 

Man of Confidence: R.Q.M.S. W.J. BOTHA, POW No. 75490

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        No change in the general lay-out of the camp. The covered air raid shelters are stated to be excellent. No military targets in the neighbourhood.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        134 South African Ps.o.W. including 3 recognised NCOs. Some of the men are working on the surface for the mine, and a part are building new roads. They have to do 8 - 9 hours a day and have every second Sunday free.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        Living accommodations are very good. No complaints about lighting or heating.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        Satisfactory.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        Satisfactory.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        Two prisoners are preparing the meals in a well equipped camp kitchen. The stock of Red Cross parcels (at the moment 1 parcel per man) is stored in a safe room outside the camp-compound. One of the 2 keys is held by the Man of Confidence.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        Two recognised sanitators are in charge of the small revier, which on the day of visit housed 6 patients. 5 other patients are lying in the Reserve-lazaret Koenigswartha and 1 in Schmorkau. None of them is a serious case. Twice a week, sickparade is held by a German civilian doctor. Dental treatment is given by a dentist at Lohsa. The supply of drugs and the general state of health are said to be satisfactory.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        The clothing situation is good, every man has 2 complete outfits.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        is sent out and works satisfactorily.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        are correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        As everywhere, beer is available.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        During the last 3 months the camp was visited once by the YMCA Chaplain, Mr. DAVEY.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Good facilities for outdoor and indoor recreation.

 

XIV) MAIL

        from South Africa is slow.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        The YMCA Representative visited this camp in October.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        None.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        Lohsa is the best camp in this district.

        The South Africa camp paper the "Veld" is distributed monthly in 16 - 18 copies to this camp. One of these is attached to this report.

 

 

Date of visit: January 15th, 1945

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 531, GRUBE OSTFELD

 

Man of Confidence: Cpl. N. VASEY, POW No. 95798

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        No change since our last visit in September 1944. There are no military targets near the camp, which includes good covered air-raid shelters.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        90 British Ps.o.W. The prisoners are employed in workshops, cleaning the rails and forest work, 7 - 10 hours daily. Only every 3rd Sunday is free.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        The living quarters, consisting in a barrack with wooden double-tier beds and a small dining compartment, are infested and not very homely. This will be changed for the better, when the new barrack, now under construction, is finished in approximately 2 months time. Heating and lighting are in order.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        Adequate, but rather primitive.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        Adequate, but rather primitive.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        Food is cooked by 2 prisoners in the camp kitchen. A stock of Red Cross parcels for 2 weeks only is left in the store room outside the camp. As before, the Man of Confidence holds one key.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        Twice a week sickparade is held by a Civilian doctor. The light cases stay in the camp and are looked after by the recognised sanitator, while serious cases are taken to the lazaret at Koenigswartha. On the day of visit 4 patients were there, but none of them dangerously ill. The dentist at Lohsa also treats the prisoners of this camp. There is a small first aid outfit.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        Every man has now 2 Red Cross Outfits.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        Laundry is done by a German woman, helped by one of the prisoners.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        are correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        Beer is available.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        The YMCA Chaplain paid a visit from time to time.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Nothing to report.

 

XIV) MAIL

        Nothing to report.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        The Delegate of the YMCA visited this camp in last October.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        It was stated by the Man of Confidence that prisoners had to act as beaters in huntings. Promise was given by the German authorities that this will be stopped at once.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        Once the new barrack is finished, the living quarters and the revier will become satisfactory. At the time being the camp is not inadequate, but not very satisfactory either.

 

 

Date of visit: January 16th, 1945.

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 508, GRUBE ERIKA

 

Man of Confidence: C.I.W. TURLER, POW No. 6297

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        No change whatsoever since our last visit in September 1944. The nearest military targets are the Lautawerke, some 2-3 miles away, which were bombed on the day of visit. No harm came to the camp or the men who sought protection in the open slit-trenches.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        293 British Ps.o.W. They work on the railway of the Grube. Although the official working hours are 10 a day, the men finish the required piece-work in 6-7 hours. At least every third Sunday is free.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        Accommodation has not changed and is still satisfactory, as well as heating and lighting facilities.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        The wash-house was renovated and hot showers are now available whenever wanted.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        is order.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        The food is cooked in a central cook-house. Unfortunately it is not possible to give a separate kitchen to the British prisoners, who would prefer to do their own cooking. The actual situation is not always working satisfactorily, but controlled by the Kommandofuehrer.

        Red Cross parcels, the stock of which is very low at the moment, are kept in a store-room out-side the camp. Although the Man of Confidence has no key, he can control them very closely.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        Two recognised sanitators are in charge of the small revier with 9 beds. On the day of visit only 2 beds were occupied by influenza cases. 3 sick from this camp are lying in lazaret Koenigswartha.

        The supply of drugs and medicaments by the Red Cross and the Stalag (the latter amounting to 25% of Red Cross Supply) is stated to be fairly good. Sickparade daily by 2 Polish doctors and twice a week by a civilian doctor. A Polish dentist is in charge of the dental treatment, such as fillings and extractions. Dentures can only be supplied by the Stalag.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        Clothing situation is good, every prisoner having 2 outfits.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        is sent out.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        Correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        only beer is available.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        A lay-preacher is holding Services every Sunday. Once in a while, the camp is visited by the Chaplain living in the Stalag.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        A large recreation-hall, destined for prisoners of all nationalities and a smaller one for British only are at the disposal of the inmates of this camp. Also outdoor recreation is well organised.

 

XIV) MAIL

        Mail from England takes 3 to 4 weeks to arrive in Germany.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        The camp was visited by a Delegate of the YMCA in October last year.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        None.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        This is a good camp.

 

 

Date of visit: January 16th, 1945

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 543, GRUBE HEYE III

 

Man of confidence: Sgt. T.R. VOLLER, POW No. 95730

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        No change. Good air-raid shelters are provided for the prisoners, although there are no military targets in the neighbourhood.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        45 English Ps.o.W. They are employed on railway and surface work in the mine, 10 hours a day. They have to work on two Sundays out of three.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        Living accommodation, lighting and heating are satisfactory.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        Once a week, every man has a hot shower.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        in order.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        Every man is his own cook. Cooking facilities and fuel supplies are adequate.

        The stock of Red Cross parcels is kept in a safe room outside the compound. One key is in the possession of the Man of Confidence.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        A German civilian doctor holds sickparade twice a week. The lighter cases stay in the camp, where a recognised sanitator is looking after them. Patients who have to stay longer in bed are transferred to lazaret. On the day of visit 2 were in Koenigswartha and 2 in Schwatz-Kolmin, none of them serious cases.

        For dental treatment, patients have to go to the Grube Erika, to a Polish dentist.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        satisfactory.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        One prisoner is in charge of the laundry. This arrangement works satisfactorily.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        only beer.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        Every 5 to 6 months this camp is visited by the padre from Stalag.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Good facilities for recreation.

 

XIV) MAIL

        nothing new to report.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        visit of a YMCA Representative in October 1944.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        Apart from the minor complaints, such as want of more washing bowls and supplementary soap supply, which could be settled on the spot by discussing them with the camp authorities, no serious complaints were brought to the knowledge of the Delegate of the Protecting Power.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        This is a satisfactory camp.

 

 

BAUTZEN DISTRICT

District Man of Confidence: Cpl. T. MARSHALL, POW No. 95923

Strength: 393 British Ps.o.W.

 

 

Date of visit: January 18th, 1945.

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 1274, Wagonfabrik Bautzen

 

Man of Confidence: Pte. L.S. SWABEY, POW No. 258132

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        The camp has been transferred to another barrack since our last visit, a transfer through which it has gained much.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        70 British Ps.o.W. are employed 10 hours daily on timber work. As a rule there is no Sunday work.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        The large sleeping room is furnished with new wooden double-tier beds. A tidy dining-room. Every prisoner has his own cupboard, where he keeps clothing and personal things. Lighting and heating facilities are good.

        Apart from the wagon-factory, which may be considered as military target, there is nothing which could justify a bombardment of the area. The air-raid shelters constructed by the prisoners themselves, are not yet finished.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        Every Saturday afternoon prisoners have hot showers in the factory.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        Adequate.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        From a week ago, prisoners have their own cook, who prepares the meals in the camp-kitchen.

        Red Cross parcels are kept in a safe room, just outside the fence. The Man of Confidence has no key, but is always present when parcels are distributed.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        Men who report sick are examined every day by a German military doctor. If patients need medical observation by a Medical Officer, they are transferred to a lazaret. On the day of visit, two men were in Hohnstein, in the Stalag revier, one in Koenigswartha and 1 in Schmorkau.

        I recognised sanitator with a well assorted first-aid equipment is looking after the lighter cases in the camp.

        For dental treatment, visits are arranged in the P.O.W. revier at Bautzen. General state of health is good.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        The clothing position is satisfactory, apart from a shortage of boots, some men having only one pair.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        Every week, laundry is sent out.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        Correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        Beer, as everywhere, is available.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        This camp has only been once visited by a padre.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Good facilities for recreation and entertainment are provided.

 

XIV) MAIL

        Nothing new to report.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        Some minor complaints could be settled on the spot.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        This is a good camp.

 

 

Date of visit: January 18th, 1945.

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 1184, KRONPRINZ KIRSCHAU

 

Man of Confidence: Driver J.M. CHAPMAN, POW No. 253186.

 

I) GENERAL DESCRIPTION

        No change since our last visit.

        The nearby factory, formerly manufacturing blankets, is now producing airplane pistons. - By increasing the strength of the camp, the slit-trenches have become too small, but will be enlarged at once.

 

II) CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL

        97 British Ps.o.W., loading and unloading wagons, work 10 hours a day. Sunday work is very exceptional and prisoners are then getting compensation on Saturday afternoon.

 

III) INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

        There is a big hall, used as sleeping and dining-room. Every prisoner has a cupboard. No complaints about lighting and heating.

 

IV) WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

        There is no running water in the camp, which causes inconvenient washing facilities during the winter time. To improve the situation, prisoners are allowed to use the washing facilities and hot showers in the factory. These are good.

 

V) TOILET FACILITIES

        In order.

 

VI) FOOD AND COOKING

        No complaints about food or cooking.

        Red Cross parcels are still inside the camp. The Man of Confidence and the Kommandofuehrer each have a key.

 

VII) MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH

        There is no recognised sanitator in the camp. One of the prisoners, Pte. GRENNBERG, POW No. 258499, had some training before the war and is looking after his fellow prisoners. It was possible to arrange two free afternoons for him.

        Twice a week, sickparade is held by a German military doctor. Dental treatment by a civilian dentist in Kirschau is stated to be excellent.

 

VIII) CLOTHING

        In order.

 

IX) LAUNDRY

        is sent out.

 

X) MONEY AND PAY

        Correct.

 

XI) CANTEEN

        Beer as usual.

 

XII) RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY

        The YMCA padre from Hohnstein visited this camp from time to time. A French Roman Catholic padre pays regular visits to the camp.

 

XIII) RECREATION AND EXERCISE

        Both, indoor recreation and sports facilities are good.

 

XIV) MAIL

        Mail from England takes about one month to arrive.

 

XV) WELFARE WORK

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI) COMPLAINTS

        No serious complaints.

 

XVII) GENERAL IMPRESSION

        This camp may be considered as good.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No. 1091, NEUKIRCH

 

Man of Confidence: Pte. W.J. ROXBY, POW No. 5947. (Interview at Kirschau)