CONFIDENTIAL

No.696

BRITISH AND AMERICANS

 

 

STALAG III A LUCKENWALDE.

 

Date of visit: 12th - 16th February 1945.

 

Stalag Commandant

Deputy

German doctor

Abwehroffizier

Accompanying Officer from the German High Command

British Chief Man of Confidence

American Chief Man of Confidence

British Medical Officer

Oberst Lutter

Oberstlt. Dr. Loehr

Oberstabsarzt Dr. Dunsing

Hptm. von Canitz

Major Boesenberg

BSM. W.A. Henderson POW No.12597

Pte R.C. Wittrup POW No.079885

Capt. Headon, R.A.M.C. POW No.1092

 

Reference is made to our previous report dated 17th November 1944.

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION.

        No change in the general outlay of the camp since our last visit.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        Due to the continuous arrival of new PoW from other Stalags the interior arrangements are absolutely inadequate.

        British POW: The living quarters are standard type barracks; they are somewhat old and in need of repair. Windows have been repaired by the POW themselves with plywood from Red Cross cases. In 3 barracks the POW are sleeping in three tier beds. - The POW coming from other Stalags on march are distributed to four barracks, some of them sleep on wood-wool spread on the floor. Only one blanket has been issued to them and no eating utensils. The quantity of fuel issued is insufficient to heat the barracks properly.

        American POW: About 1'100. American POW are sleeping in four barracks with double and triple tier beds; there is a great shortage of bedboards, straw and mattresses. Besides these 1100 men about 2700 American POW who came from other Stalags are sleeping in tents with no heat, each man has only one blanket. These men are sleeping on a small amount of straw thrown on the ground in very crowded tents.

        Shelters: Shelters are in order; there is no military target near the main camp.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        On the day of visit there were in this Stalag:

                British POW: N.C.O.        300 )

                                     Privates        540 ) all Irish POW.

                                     Parachutists  130

                British POW in the base camp: 970

                British POW detailed on 19 working detachments: 660

                Total number of British POW: 1630

        American POW: the first American POW arrived at this Stalag approximately 7 weeks ago. At the present time there are about:

                Privates and N.C.O. coming in from different Stalags: 4000

                Men detailed on 7 different working detachments (old prisoners): 669

                Total strength of American POW: 4669

        The following are all the working detachments of American and British POW:

                British Working Detachments attached to Stalag IIIA

Detachment

Brandenburg

Brandenburg

Gerdshagen

Gräbendorf

Halbe

Kummernitz

Liepe

Nennhausen

Neurüppin

Nonnendorf

No.

771

186

1540

1127b

503

266

192

180

179

1581

Strength

41

82

17

11

43

12

10

31

49

12

Detachment

Potsdam

Bornim

Satzkorn

Selbelang

Selchow

Vogtsbrügge

Wolfshagen

Luckenwalde

Gross Behnitz

No.

579E

185

1140

475

174

833B

260

338

130A

Strength

76

30

65

36

29

47

45

10

19

                American Working Detachments attached to Stalag IIIA

Wuensdorf

Perleberg

Teltow

Jueterbog

Jueterbog

Potsman

Rheinsberg

 

653-A

941-K

340

416-0

166

189

170

499E

249

125

18

99

115

22

23

 

[Page Missing]

 

Day

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Meat

30

20

30

20

30

20

50

Margarine

25

25

25

 

25

25

25

Oatmeal

50

50

50

50

50

50

Potatoes

500

500

500

500

500

500

750

Sugar

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

Tea

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Bread

300

300

375

300

200

200

200

Cheese

 

 

 

62.5

Flour

 

 

 

 

70

70

100

Peas

 

 

 

 

 

 

75

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION.

        The staff is composed of 1 British Medical Officer (Capt. Headon)

                                              3 N.C.O. and

                                              10 protected personnel

        mainly unit medical orderlies, R.A.S.C. drivers. All these men are employed as medical orderlies in the camp revier.

        The B.M.O. gave the following report to the Delegate of the Protecting Power:

        "The revier is housed in a half barrack inside the British Compound. Total number of beds available for patients seventy-two, sixty of these beds are ordinary barrack beds, twelve are iron bed frames with iron springs. Bed linen is not supplied. Cooking facilities are nil, any preparation of special foods for patients is carried out on small coal fires in the Revier. Patients requiring special diets can be issued with one and a half litres of German porridge which is prepared in a German diet kitchen outside the Compound. Sterilization of syringes etc. is a matter of extreme difficulty, at the moment the one available sterilizer is away for repair, sterilization is carried out in a small pot boiled over a small fire. Patients detained in the Revier are mainly minor sick and chronic cases requiring little treatment at the moment owing to the large inflow of prisoners into the camp, more serious cases such as severe influenzas and diarrheas have to be detained their treatment owing to the poor cooking and preparation facilities is a matter of extreme difficulty. There is an acute shortage of drugs and dressings at the moment, German supplies indented for have not been available, no Red Cross medical units are available in the Stalag. This shortage is most pronounced regarding dressings and bandages, especially as a large number of patients are reporting with frost-bitten toes.

        Invalid parcels in hand 191. On account of the very debilitated condition of patients and the complete stoppage of ordinary Red Cross parcels this number will last only for three weeks.

        Emergency cases and serious cases are treated in the Lagerlazarett which lies outside the lager boundary.

        The British section of this hospital consists of thirty-six beds, treatment is carried out be French physicians and surgeons, and Yugoslavian specialists in ophthalmology, ear nose and throat etc. The nursing of British patients is carried out by British orderlies, five orderlies are employed in the lazarett. Four of these are RAMC, one is a unit medical orderly.

        Patients requiring outpatient specialist treatment can attend the various departments in the lazarett twice during the week. This arrangement works very well and all patients can be handled.

        DENTAL TREATMENT is carried out in the dental department in the Stalag Lazarett, French dentists dealing with the patients.

        The most urgent points at present are the acute shortage of medical units and invalid food parcels in the lazarett and in the Revier. The situation of the Revier is very unsatisfactory, a building separated from the compound would make the treatment of patients easier and give better nursing facilities."

 

VIII. CLOTHING

        The clothing position is unsatisfactory since almost all of the POW possess only one complete uniform. As there is no stock of clothing in the Stalag, the Germans are unable to provide the POW with outfits, underwear, socks or boots. The situation of the POW in working detachments is particularly bad. The only articles issued by the German were some old worn-out overcoats (French) and some hats (Belgian).

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        Due to the lack of electric steam the water in the central laundry of the camp cannot be heated, so that POW have to do their laundry themselves as well as possible. The American POW had no laundry whatsoever since they arrived at this camp seven weeks ago. The Germans stated that hot water must first be used for the delousing barrack and the revier.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        In Order.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        In the general canteen for the whole Stalag the POW could buy some small items such as matches and foot-powder.

 

XII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        With regard to the winter season no outdoor sports are practised; for indoor entertainment the POW could use the camp's theatre twice a week.

 

XIII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        Until now the Roman Catholic POW were attended by a French priest as a British or American padre could not be found. With the arrival of POW from other Stalags there came also a British Catholic priest, Captain Berry. The Delegate of the Protecting Power discussed this case with the Germans and finally the Stalag Commandant agreed to the Delegate's wish to keep this Roman Catholic priest back in the Stalag. Captain Berry will also be allowed to visit all the working detachments pertaining to this Stalag.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Mail is reported to be very slow.

 

XV. WELFARE ACTIVITY:

        A representative of the I.R.C.C. paid a visit to this Stalag a fortnight ago.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        In the final meeting with the Stalag authorities all points mentioned in this report were discussed. The main requests concerned the clothing position, the delousing of the POW from working detachment Wuensdorf No.499E, the transfer of 2 sick POW from the revier to the lazarett, eventually the transfer of one of these two POW to the Lazarett Elsterhorst (T.B.), the lack of copies of the Geneva Convention in all the working detachments visited by the Delegate of the Protecting Power and the shortage of spoons at working detachment Juesterbog No.340. - The Germans promised to settle all those points according to the wishes of the Delegate of the Protecting Power.

 

XVII. General Impression:

        On the day of visit Stalag III A Luckenwalde made a sorry impression. Through the sudden arrival of several thousands of new POW from other camps, the Stalag authorities were confronted with immense difficulties which they tried to overcome to the best of their ability. It must be borne in mind that all measures taken were of a temporary nature and will be improved within a short time.

 

sgd: Fritz Dasen.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENTS DEPENDING ON STALAG III A LUCKENWALDE.

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.579 E, BABELSBERG

 

BRITISH (Irish)

Date of visit: February 13th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Cpl. J. AHERNE, POW No.4946.

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

        The camp is situated near the building of the German Red Cross Presidency, the cellars of which are used as air-shelters in case of an alarm. No military targets in the neighbourhood.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        80 Irish POWs work daily 8 hours for the German Red Cross. As a rule there is no Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        3 barracks are furnished with iron double-tier beds with springs. The dining-room is closed down at the moment for want of coal. Lighting and heating of the sleeping rooms are satisfactory.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        Hot showers once a week.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        In order.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING.

        Food is prepared by a British cook and his help. The prisoners have run out of parcels. No complaints about food and cooking.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        Sickparade is held twice weekly by a civilian doctor at Babelsberg. Serious cases are sent back to the Stalag. Lighter cases stay in the camp and are looked after by a recognised sanitator. Limited dental treatment by a dentist of the German Red Cross. Medical attention and state of health are said to be good. On the day of visit, there were no patients.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        Each man has two Red Cross outfits.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        Laundry is done by the prisoners themselves and works satisfactorily.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        Small supply with cantine-goods. Beer is scarce at the moment.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        A French padre is visiting the camp regularly.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        Good recreation and entertainment facilities.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Mail is stated to be slow.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        No activity.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Cpl. McCRYSTAL asked in December to be released from work and sent back to the Stalag. He is still working. Upon protests of the Delegate of the Protecting Power, the NCO was sent back to the Stalag the following day.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        The camp makes a good impression, but will be dissolved within the next few days.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.166 POTSDAM

 

American

Date of visit: February 13th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Pte. J.E. SYROCCYNSKI, No.81763.

 

I. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        The camp lies in a stone-building in the yard of the RUINENBERG Kaserne. There are adequate air-raid shelters, but no military targets in the neighbourhood, apart from the buildings of the Kaserne.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        22 American POWs employed in digging and earthwork. They do 9 hours a day. Every second Sunday is free.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        One room is furnished with wooden double-tier beds, the other with chairs and tables. There is no coal available, but any amount of wood can be brought into the camp. Lighting and heating are in order.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        Up to now, only cold water was at the disposal of the prisoners. Arrangements are made to allow every prisoner one hot shower a week.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        In order.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        Food is cooked in the central kitchen. A ration scale will be given to the Man of Confidence, to control the daily issue of food. Ration-scale for February please see under point VI of the report of the Stalag. No Red Cross parcels have yet arrived.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        Every day sickparade by a German military doctor in the Revier. There is no recognised medical orderly and no medical equipment in the camp. On the day of the visit one prisoner was lying in bed with fever. In general state of health is good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        Overcoats and rubbershoes were taken away when captured. No supplementary clothing was issued since and prisoners have only what they have been captured in, which is definitely insufficient.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        No laundry.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        Prisoners will receive beer and German cigarettes.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        At the moment no facilities for indoor or outdoor recreation.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Nothing to report.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Some minor complaints were settled on the spot.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        Being a recently opened camp, Potsdam is not yet satisfactory in every respect. Some clothing and a supplementary set of underwear are most urgently needed.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.1140, SATZKORN.

 

British/Irish

Date of visit: February 14th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Pte. W. CARROLL, POW No.6962.

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

        The camp consists of two barracks in the yard of the Heeresverpflegungamt. There are no military targets in the neighbourhood. Good air-raid shelters are provided for in the buildings.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        62 Irish POWs are employed in loading and unloading waggons, 8 hours daily. Up to now, the prisoners had to work every [line missing] of the Protecting Power protested against this regular Sunday work. In future every 3rd Sunday at least will be entirely at the disposal of the prisoners.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        The 3 sleeping-rooms are furnished with wooden double-tier beds of the usual type. Fuel can be fetched in sufficient quantities and the good stoves grant a good heating of the rooms. Lighting is satisfactory.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        The shower-rooms were closed a fortnight ago, but hot water is available when prisoners come back from work.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        Adequate.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        3 Irish cooks prepare the meals in a large kitchen. German rations are stated to be according to scale. The safe store-room for Red Cross parcels outside the camp is empty at the moment. One of the two keys is in the possession of the Man of Confidence.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH.

        Sickparade is held every day by a German military doctor in the nearby German lazarett. Sick are transferred to the Stalag. There is no recognised sanitator and no medical equipment in the camp. Dental treatment by a civilian and general state of health are said to be good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING.

        Every man has two complete Red Cross outfits. No complaints about clothing.

 

IX. LAUNDRY.

        Two men are doing the laundry in the wash-house, where a hot boiler is installed.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct. About RM 54 - a month.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        Beer and some cantine-goods are available.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        There are some games and some books in the camp. Sport facilities are good, but not much used in the winter.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Mail is said to be slow. The last letters received were dated on the beginning of December.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Last week every man as deprived of a blanket. When asked for explanation the German officer in charge of the camp informed the Delegate of the Protecting Power that he had received a new order, cancelling the old one. Therefore the blankets will be returned at once.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        This is a good camp.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.186, BRANDENBURG

 

British/Irish

Date of visit: February 14th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Sgt. B.D. ROBINSON No.12611

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

        Stone-building in the yard of the Heeresnebenzeugamt. About 500 yards away are the Arado airplane factories. Good shelters for the prisoners.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        71 Irish POWs are loading and unloading waggons. They work 9 1/2 hours a day and have free on Sundays.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        There is one large sleeping room with double-tier beds and one large dining room. Lighting is good. The prisoners have stoves in both rooms, but the fuel question is very unsatisfactory. Coal is not available and wood is not easy to find in the town of Brandenburg. So the German officer decided to give old wooden saddles to the prisoners. These saddles have iron bands and other iron parts all over them. As the prisoners have neither the time nor the necessary tools to separate the iron from the wood, they have to burn the whole parts, which is definitely inadequate. It could be arranged that in future ten men will daily prepare the wood for heating and another then men will be sent out to fetch wood in the near forest. This will improve the heating situation.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        Due to the lack of coal hot showers are no more available.

 

V. TOILET FACILTIES:

        Primitive.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        2 cooks are preparing the meals for their comrades. Rations are checked regularly and found according to scale. Concerning the fuel question the same difficulties arise as mentioned under point III. They could be settled in the same way. There are no Red Cross food parcels in stock. A second locker will be fixed to the store-room and the key given to the Man of Confidence.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        A German military doctor is holding sickparade three times a week. Serious cases are sent to the Stalag. There is one recognised sanitator with a small first-aid equipment in the camp. Dental treatment by a military dentist is said to be good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        Each prisoner has one British outfit. The supply with underwear is very poor.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        Laundry is done by the women in the nearby Straflager.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        Only beer and lemonade are available.


XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        No activity.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        There are no outdoor recreation facilities, but also the desire for such is not specially expressed. Some books and games are in the camp.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Nothing to report.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Some minor complaints were settled on the spot when discussing the points with the German officer in charge of the camp.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        This camp may be considered as adequate.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.771, NEUBRANDENBURG

 

Man of Confidence: L/Cpl. J.N. CLIFFORD, POW No.8699 (Interview at Brandenburg No.186).

 

Strength: 61 Irish POWs.

 

Kind of work: Loading and unloading waggons, 8 1/2 hours a day, every second Sunday is free.

 

Air-shelters: Adequate, no military targets near the camp.

 

Red Cross parcels: No stock. Safe store-room outside the camp. In order.

 

Medical attention: Sickparade by German military doctor. Satisfactory.

 

Drugs: First aid box in the camp.

 

Fuel: 50 kg. of brikets a day for heating and kitchen. No wood.

 

Complaints: Some small requests, such as opening of the windows at night etc. were settled on the spot.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.170 TELTOW (Wehrkreisverwaltung)

 

AMERICAN

Date of visit: February 15th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Pte. G.F. SHANKS POW No.84387

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

        This camp, opened three weeks ago, consists of two wooden barracks in a large compound. There are adequate air-raid shelters in the cellar of a stone-building. No military targets are near the camp.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        17 American POWs are building brick-houses 8 hours a day. At least one Sunday in three is at the disposal of the prisoners.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        One barrack is installed as sleeping room with wooden double-tier beds, some chairs and two tables. The stove is heated with wood, as no coal is available.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        A wash-room will be set up in the second barrack. At the moment there is only cold water and some bowls. A boiler for heating water is in the open air.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        In order.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        Food is cooked in the central cook-house by French prisoners. In future a rations scale will be given to Man of Confidence to enable him to control the correct issue of the rations. No parcels have yet arrived and there is also no store-room prepared for them.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        Medical attention is stated to be good. When needed a French doctor comes to the camp. There is no recognised medical orderly and no first-aid equipment in the camp. Dental treatment and general state of health are good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        The prisoners have what they have been captured in. An additional set of underwear and distributed yesterday.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        The prisoners do their laundry themselves.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        French prisoners have supplied the camp with some beer.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        The American Chief Man of Confidence in the Stalag has been informed that books and games are needed.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Nothing to report.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Some minor complaints were settled by discussing them with the German authorities.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        When the camp is completed, it will become satisfactory. This could be done within two weeks.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.499 E, WUENSDORF

 

American

Date of visit: February 15th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Sgt. W.A. TRETTER, No.90476

 

I. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        The camp with a large compound lies in the forest, near the military training camp. Apart of it, there is no military target. Good air-raid shelters.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        248 American POWs. 228 doing wood and road work, 8 hours a day. As a rule Sunday is free. On February 12th, 1945, 19 NCOs and 1/Lt. S.M. AWRAMIK, USAMC, arrived from Stalag III B, Fürstenberg. They marched 13 days. Food was only distributed on three occasions. They are now accommodated in a separate barrack. The NCOs do not work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        The prisoners sleep in 10 barracks with 24 double-tier beds in each. Every barrack has a stove and some chairs and tables. Lighting and heating are satisfactory. Wood is unlimited quantity can be fetched in the forest.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

        A wash house is built by the prisoners themselves and will be ready in a few days. Hot showers are not available at the moment, but water can be heated in the boiler.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        In order.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        5 men are cooking in a good kitchen. Rations are controlled and found according to scale. Enough fuel is issued: 70 kg. of coal a day. No Red Cross parcels have yet arrived. A safe store-room is provided for them.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        1/Lt. Awramik, who arrived three days ago, has taken charge of the small Revier with 4 beds. Sickparade is held every morning by the American Medical Officer who can decide if a man is fit for work or not. There are two recognised medical orderlies in the Camp. Some small medical supply has been brought from Fürstenberg. Serious cases are sent to the Stalag. On the day of visit, one patient with rheumatism was in the Revier. Dental treatment is given by a military dentist.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        The prisoners have been provided with Belgian overcoats and a pair of long trousers. They are still short of socks and underwear.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        At the moment inadequate, but will work satisfactorily in the future.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        None.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        No activity yet.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        At the moment there are no facilities for recreation and entertainment. The YMCA will be informed of the situation.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        No mail has arrived.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        Some minor complaints, such as the more frequent emptying of the latrines, the disinfection of the camp, were settled on the spot.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        Since the arrival of the Medical Officer and the NCOs the camp has much improved; it may be considered as adequate.

 

 

WORKING DETACHMENT No.340, NEUES LAGER, JUETERBOG

 

AMERICAN

Date of visit: February 15th. 1945.

Man of Confidence: Pte. M.A. DREHER, No.94658.

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

        The camp consists of two wooden barracks in a large compound. There is no military target near the camp. Good air-raid shelters are at the disposal of the prisoners.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

        97 American POWs. They are employed in digging and wood-work. The working-hours are 9 1/2 hours a day. As a rule there is no Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS:

        Three large sleeping-rooms with iron double-tier beds. Each man has two blankets. Heating is satisfactory, but the stoves need cleaning. This was promised by the German authorities. Light is satisfactory in two rooms, in the third it is too weak. The Germans promised to remedy this complaint.

 

IV. BATHING AND WASHING FACILITIES:

        In order.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

        In order, but primitive.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

        2 men cook in a clean and well-equipped kitchen. Rations can be controlled. Sufficient fuel is issued for the kitchen. No Red Cross parcels have been received yet.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND STATE OF HEALTH:

        Sickparade is held daily by a German military doctor. Serious cases are taken to the Stalag. There are no recognised medical orderlies in this camp. A dentist in Jueterbog is in charge of the dental treatment.

 

VIII. CLOTHING:

        Prisoners have only one outfit and one set underwear. As no stock of underwear is in the Stalag and the Germans are not in a position to issue any new supplies from the Red Cross must be waited for.

 

IX. LAUNDRY:

        No laundry, because the prisoners can not change their clothing.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

        No pay yet.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

        Only beer is available.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

        None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

        No facilities have been provided for.

 

XIV. MAIL:

        Up to now no mail has arrived.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

        Nothing to report.

 

XVI. COMPLAINTS:

        It was stated by the Man of Confidence that out of the 97 prisoners in this camp, only 60 have been issued with a spoon and a fork. The Delegate of the Protecting Power protested energetically against such conditions where prisoners had to eat with their fingers, and told the German Officer in charge of the Kommando that he would report this case to the Stalag Commandant which was also done. The German Officer promised that the missing spoons and forks will be delivered at once.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

        This camp has been opened a week or two prior to this visit and must be still considered as under construction. Once finished it could become a good camp.

 

sgd. Fritz Dasen.