CONFIDENTIAL

No.730

BRITISH/AMERICAN

Date of visit. 11 - 16 March, 1945

 

STALAG IV G  OSCHATZ

 

Commandant : Oberst Neureiter

Arbeitseinsatz : Hptm. Heger

Accompanying Officer of the German High Command : Rittmeister v. Frankenberg

British Chief Man of Confidence : Sgt. James Wakelin, POW No.229186

 

Reference is made to the previous report No. 645, dated 17 - 18 November 1944.

 

On the day of the visit the strength of .this Stalag was given as follows:

 

British:

English

3837

 

Irish

7

 

Canadians

86

 

Australians

23

 

New Zealanders

70

 

South Africans

304

 

de Gaullistes

7

 

Other British

123

 

Total British

4457

Americans:

776

Grand Total

British and American

5233

 

There were only 20 British and American POW in the camp, forming the staff. The Chief Man of Confidence had no complaints as far as the staff was concerned. After completing the tour of inspection, the Delegate of the Protecting Power discussed all points raised by the Men of Confidence of the working parties visited with the Chief Man of Confidence. The British POW from this Stalag are detailed as follows:

 

District:

No. of Kdos.

No. of POW

Borna

7

360

Doebeln

7

230

Oschatz

3

100

Nossen

2

40

Leipzig Ost

9

960

Leipzig West

7

570

Leipzig Nord

6

370

Wurzen

9

550

Grimma

5

350

Meissen

6

190

Espenhain

3

580

Staff, in Revier & Lazarets

 

157

Total:

64 Kdos.

4457 Br. POW

 

The American POW are divided so:

Borna

1

100

Doebeln

3

116

Leipzig Nord

3

139

Leipzig West

4

340

Oschatz

1

25

Lazaret Leipzig-Wahren

 

36

Lazaret Wurzen

 

10

Staff

 

10

Total:

12 Kdos.

776 Amer. POW

 

On the day of the visit the following British Medical Officers were attached to this Stalag:

Rank

Name

POW No.

Hospital

Major

T.R. Brian Courtney

91202

Laz.Leipzig-Wahren, P.N.452, "Goldener Löwe", Laube Str., Leipzig N 22

Capt.

Vincent Wright

228313

Kfg.Rev.Bad Lausick, Schutzenstr.

Capt.

S.T. Mawson

1676

Kfg.Rev.Naunhof ü Grimma. Villa Jansen

Capt.

McPherson

228255

Laz.Wurzen. Gustloff 2

Capt.

Frederick Webster

228333

Kfg.Kr.Rev.Leipzig, C 1, Gneisenaustr.10

Capt.

Moody

8343 (6)

Stalag IV D/Z, Annaburg

 

Report of deaths:

The Delegate of the Protecting Power regrets having to report the deaths of 24 British prisoners of war who, during the air-raid on Leipzig on February 27th, 1945, were killed. These POW were in well-built slip trenches with their German guards but received a direct hit and were killed immediately. A list of the names of these men, with addresses of next-of-kin is adjoined to this report. (Annexe I)

 

Religious Activity:

Capt. the Rev. Frank Chadwick gave a written report on his activities to the Delegate of' the Protecting Power and a list of POW who died in the period from November 13th 1944 to February 13th 1945. These are attached in original to the end of this report. (Annexe 2)

 

Medical Attention:

As there is no British Medical Officer in the Stalag itself, the Delegate received a detailed report from the Medical Officer, Capt. R. Moody attached to the British revier at Leipzig, Gneisenaustrasse. The main points of this report are as follows:

 

I. Condition of Americans

A. Complaint

The number of Americans in the Leipzig area is approximately 700. From a medical point view the condition of these troops is shocking. They came to sick-parade and into hospitals for treatment in a most dreadful condition. The general state of health of the Americans is bad. They are filthy, in many cases they have not washed for many days, they are unkempt and they show every evidence of complete lack care. The great majority of' them have lost many pounds (in some cases stones) in weight, and they are suffering from acute undernourishment which is showing itself in the usual accompaniments of starvation, oedema, giddy faints, avitaminosis, diarrhoea etc.

 

B. Action

a) Increase Ration Scale

Already we have made some effort to ameliorate the food position of the Americans and in reply to a letter from Capt. F. Webster concerning increase in ration scale, the German authorities say that during the next ration period certain American Kommandos will have increased ration scale.

 

b) From a medical point of view I suggest that all American troops be removed to areas where they can do light work, even non- working Kommandos.

 

II. Medical Supplies and Invalid Food.

The supply of medical materials in drugs, dressings etc. from the German authorities is insufficient and quite inadequate for our purposes. We have a limited supply of British medical supplies, but these are rapid1y running out. Is there any likelihood of replenishment? We have to serve approximately 20 Invalid Food parcels, which have to serve 2500 Anglo-Americans, a very difficult task in these days of food shortage.

 

III. Revier, Gneisenau Strasse, Leipzig.

a) This revier is within a zone of military importance. It is approximately 600 -700 yards from the Main Central Leipzig Station.

 

b) The general conditions in this revier for the treatment of' the sick are unsatisfactory.

 

c) Rations. Food for 73rd period.

 

Weekly Scale

Bread

1400 grms.

Flour

240 "

Meat

315 "

Cheese or

28 "

Quark

62 "

Macaroni, Barley etc.

54 "

Sugar

205 "

Jam spreads

155 "

Coffee

32 "

Potatoes

2625 "

Pigs dripping

86 "

 

General:

The 2 British Medical Officers and 2 British medical orderlies attached to the Revier, Gneissenaustrasse, Leipzig provide medical treatment for approx. 2500 Anglo-American ps.o.w. The Medical:

 

British POW Revier

Gneissenaustrasse, Leipzig

14th March 1945.

 

Parcels:

This Stalag has been approximately 6 weeks without any Red Cross parcels, so that the Stalag received, numerous complaints from all Men of Confidence about the shortage of German rations given to prisoners of war. Five wagons arrived on the day of the visit from Sagan with Red Cross parcels with a special order from the German High Command, that these parcels should be distributed to the POW at Stalag IV G. This will permit the Chief Man of Confidence to deliver 2 parcels to each man, which will be a very great help.

 

At the final meeting with the Stalag authorities, the following points were brought up for discussion:

 

1. General State of Health

The state of health of all new POW, especially of the Americans, is extremely bad, due mainly to the 1ong marches from the West Front to the camps and to the lack of sufficient food. The Delegate met prisoners of war with legs like those of children of 10 years, who were nothing but skin and bones and absolutely unfit for work.. At Working Party No.204, for instance, on the day of the visit only 18 men were at work out of a total of 45 American POW. The others were sick in the barrack-rooms or in the hospital. Most of the American prisoners suffer from malnutrition, frozen feet, dysentery and general weakness. The Delegate of the Protecting Power drew attention to the bad state of health to the Stalag authorities and asked for another special medical examination of all these new prisoners. The Stalag doctors had already been informed of these shortcomings and, with the agreement of the Stalag Commandant, promised the immediate withdrawal of all American POW who are unfit for work. He stated that these POW would be sent to special Kommandos for light work or, if necessary, to a lazaret or revier.

 

2. District Men of Confidence

Up to date the British Men of Confidence were not allowed to visit the new American working Kommandos in their respective areas. The Chief Man of Confidence's request was, however, granted and in future each district Man of Confidence may visit all the working parties in his area.

 

3. Working Parties

Nos. 39 and 41 Leipzig Ost Both Men of Confidence reported that the food supplied by the Germans is very bad and often not according to the actual scale. The Stalag Commandant promised to have this matter thoroughly investigated.

 

4. Chaplain

The request of the British Chaplain, to visit the American working parties, was agreed to.

 

5. District Borna

In the Russian camp at Grosszoossen and at working party No.106 Ka1kschacht there are approximately 50 British prisoners of war who were evacuated from eastern camps and who could not follow the columns. They are all sick and 1ying on straw on the floor. Most of them are suffering from pneumonia, dyphtheria or frozen feet.

 

The German Stabsarzt promised to look after this matter personally.

 

6. Working Party No.20 Bohrigen

This camp was visited by the Delegate of the Protecting Power in the presence of the Stalag deputy command. As conditions and the general state of health of all American POW are bad, a promise was given by the Stalag Commandant to dissolve this working party, within the next few days.

 

7. District Grimma

The district Man, of Confidence complained that the two German Kommandoführer at working parties No.434 Grossteinberg and No.353 Hohnstadt are unfitted for the handling of prisoners of war. The Stalag Commandant promised to examine this complaint and to remove both men if found guilty.

 

8. Some minor points were also discussed and settled immediately.

 

 

 

sgd. Fritz Dasen

 

Working Detachment No.204- Böhringen,

AMERICAN

Date of visit: 12th March 1945.

Man of Confidence: PFC. J. Licowitch POW No.315360

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp is situated in a stone building in the village of Böhringen. There is an ammunition factory about 200 yards away. No air-raid shelters for the prisoners.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

45 American POW working in a stone quarry. They work 8 -9 hours a day but have no Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

Two rooms, one in the basement ~and one on the first floor, have been allotted to the prisoners. They are both furnished with wooden double-tier beds. Lighting is good but heating is regarded as insufficient. Not every man has 2 blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

Adequate

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES

Adequate

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

The prisoners have their own cook in a kitchen outside the compound. The rations distributed are not always according to scale and an investigation into this matter is necessary. There is neither a stock of Red Cross parcels nor a room for such a stock.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick-parade is held three times a week by a French doctor. Serious cases are sent to the Stalag. There is no medical orderly nor any supply of medicaments in this camp. Most of the prisoners are in a very poor condition of health, due mainly to hardship of the transport from the front to the camp. From the 45 inmates of this camp, 11 are in hospital and 16 remain in the camp daily because of not being fit for work. They are suffering from malnutrition, frozen feet and infections.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

The clothing position is poor. The men have the clothes they were captured in which is not sufficient. Not every man has an overcoat.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

As the prisoners have only one set of underwear, no laundry is possible.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No canteen.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

No faci1ities at all.

 

XIV. MAIL

No Mail has arrived yet.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

The majority of the prisoners in this camp are not fit for work. Since the conditions in general at this camp are very bad, the Delegate of the Protecting Power asked the Sta1ag Commandant to dissolve it. This request was granted so that the camp will be dissolved within the next few days.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.231, Kriebethal

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 12th, 1945

Man of Confidence: L/Cpl. G. Tose, POW No. 253410

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp lies in the yard of the paper factory in the very small village of Kriebethal. There are no air-raid shelters but also no military targets.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

64 British POW, all doing some kind of work in the above mentioned factory. They work 8 hours daily and have Sundays off.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

The prisoners are accommodated in four sleeping rooms with double-tier beds of the usual type. Lighting is satisfactory. An adequate stove was installed in each room but heating was stopped in March. By request of the Delegate of the Protective Power, the men will be allowed to gather wood and continue with the heating. Each man has at least two blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

In order.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

In order.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

German food is cooked by a Serbian prisoner in the camp kitchen. A ration scale will be given to the Man of Confidence. At the moment there are no parcels in the camp.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick-parade is held three times a week by a French doctor at Doebeln. There is no recognised sanitator in the camp but the Man of Confidence is provided with a small outfit of medicaments and bandages. Serious cases are sent to the stalag. On the day of the visit, there were 8 patients with stomach troubles or 'flu' in the camp. Very good dental treatment is available from a civilian dentist at Waldheim.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

Apart from underwear the clothing situation is not too bad.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is done by the prisoners themselves.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

Some canteen goods are sent from the Stalag.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

Due to the transport difficulties, the Chaplain is not able to visit the camp any more. The Man of Confidence holds a short service on Sundays when prayers are said.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

In order.

 

XIV. MAIL

As everywhere, incoming mail has become slow and slow and scarce.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

Due to the new arrivals, there is a shortage of 12 drinking cups. They will be provided as soon as possible.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

This is a satisfactory camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.203, Grossweitschen

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 12th, 1945

Man of Confidence: Pte. D. Miller, POW No. 248898

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

A wooden barrack in the small farming village of Grossweitschen. There is no military target in the vicinity of the camp. For ARP POW are allowed to go into the cellar.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

24 British POW building air-raid shelters at the station of Doebeln. They work 8 hours a. day and have Saturday afternoons and Sundays free.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

One large room is used at the same time for sleeping and dining room. Lighting is good. Coal is not available and the rooms have to be heated with wood which is brought into the camp. Each room has two blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

Good

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

Good.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

British cooks work in the small kitchen. There were no complaints about the food or cooking. There is no stock of Red Cross parcels.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

The sick are sent three times a. week to a French doctor at Doebeln. There is no sanitator in the camp and very little supply of medicaments. Dental treatment by a civilian dentist at Doebeln is said to be good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

The prisoners have one outfit and some underwear, mostly private articles.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is sent out.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

Small supplies are sent from the stalag.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

Good facilities for both indoor and outdoor recreation.

 

XIV. MAIL

Bad.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

None.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

This is a good Kommando.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.44, Grauschwitz

AMERICAN

Date of visit: March 12th, 1945

Man of Confidence: Pte. E. Stanko, POW No. 83153

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

There has been no change in the layout of the camp since our last visit on November 18th, 1944. No military targets near the camp, good air-raid shelters.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

23 American POW are employed in the Kartoffelflockenfabrik and work 8 hours daily. There is no Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

No change.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

Very good, the prisoners can take hot showers whenever they like.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

No change, still satisfactory.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Good. The prisoners can have as many potatoes as they wish. They are even a1lowed to take some to the stalag for the Chaplain and the Chief Man of Confidence.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

The sick can go three times a week to see a French doctor at Oschatz. In the camp there is neither a recognised sanitator nor any supply of medicaments. Dental treatment by a dentist at Oschatz is good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

Unfortunately the situation regarding clothing has not changed much since our last visit. A certain amount of underwear has been distributed amongst the men but the position is still unsatisfactory.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is sent out.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

No change

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No change

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

No change

 

XIII. RECREATION AND EXERCISE:

Good indoor recreation possibilities. Owing to two escapes last week all outdoor recreation has been stopped.

 

XIV. MAIL

Mail is said to come in quite regularly. It takes from 6 - 8 weeks.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

None.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

The old complaints, mentioned in our last report, have been settled as promised, and there were no new ones brought to the notice of the Delegate.

 

XVII .GENERAL IMPRESSION:

This has become a good camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.654, Coswig

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 13th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: L/Cpl. A.J. Warford 

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

No change since the last visit on 18th November 1944. There are no military targets in the neighbourhood.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

27 British prisoners of war work for the "Kirchbach'sche Werke" 8 hours a day. As a rule Saturdays and Sundays are free.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

No change.

 

IV . WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

No change.

 

V . TOILET FACILITIES:

No change.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Since our last visit, a well equipped kitchen has been installed and one of the prisoners acts as cook. Food rations are said to be according to scale. There is an adequate room for Red Cross stocks but it is empty at present.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick can go to the revier at Coswig on two fixed days a week, where they are attended to by a French doctor. Serious cases are sent to the revier at Meissen. No sanitator in the camp.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

Since our last visit, the situation regarding boots and underwear has much improved, regarding uniforms, however, it is still unsatisfactory.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

The German firm in the town is now reported to work satisfactorily and missing; articles are replaced.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY:

No change.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No change.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

No change.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

No change.

 

XIV. MAIL:

No change.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

No change.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

No complaints were put forward to the Delegate of the Protecting Power.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

This is still a good camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.682, Meissen

BRITISH

Date of visit: March13th, 1945

Man of Confidence: L/Bdr. J.E. Mace, POW No. 227506

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp is set up in the third floor of a brick factory situated west of Meissen, on the road to Oschatz. No Military targets and the shelters provided for the POWs are adequate.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

33 British POWs employed on the construction of "Not-Behelfsheime" work 9 hours daily. There is no Sunday work. Another 20 men, also belonging to this Kommando, were transferred two weeks ago to a forest Kommando near Moritzburg. The conditions there are reported to be adequate. These men are expected back in 2-3 weeks.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

One room is arranged as a sleeping and the other as dining-room. Lighting and heating are satisfactory. Wood for heating is brought in daily by the prisoners when returning from work. Each man has been supplied with 2 blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

Satisfactory. There is a washroom with cold showers in the camp and hot showers are available at the factory.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

Good.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Meals are prepared in the central cookhouse. Complaints settled. The store-room for Red Cross parcels is safe and has two locks, but it is empty at the moment.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick parade is held twice a week by a French doctor at Meissen. There is no recognised sanitator in the camp but a trained medical male nurse looks after the sick and serious cases are sent to the revier at Meissen. Dental treatment good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

Apart from a certain shortage of underwear, the clothing situation is adequate.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Sent out

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No canteen.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

Games, books, table tennis etc. are at the disposal of the prisoners.

 

XIV. MAIL:

Nothing to report.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK:

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

No serious complaints were brought to the notice of the Delegate.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

A good camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.255, Markranstädt

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 14th, 1945

Man of Confidence: Cpl. E.F. Cawood, POW No. 224354

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp is situated in a stone building north of the village. There are no military targets in the vicinity of the camp and the prisoners have built good covered slit trenches themselves.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

183 South African POWs. At the time being only 50 men work for the sugar factory. They do 8-9 hours daily. The rest are employed by the Town Council of Leipzig. They work 8 hours a day but due to the transport difficulties are actually 13 hours away from the camp each day. There is no Sunday work for either party.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

Four rooms furnished with wooden double-tier beds and tables and chairs. Heating and lighting are reported to be good. Each man has been supplied with 2 blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

The men working for the factory can have daily hot showers, the others once a week or a fortnight. Washing facilities in the camp are in order.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

Adequate.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Three British POWs work in the central cookhouse in the town; they control the issuing of rations and found them according to scale. As everywhere, there are no stocks of Red Cross parcels.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

We were informed that a lazaret was opened 4 days ago at Kulkwitz, 3 miles away. Capt. E. Stevenson-Wright, formerly in Schmorkau, is in charge of the lazaret, which can accommodate about 120-150 patients. Prisoners reporting sick are now sent to this recently opened lazaret. There is one recognised sanitator in the camp with a small First Aid box. Dental treatment is very good. Every two men are sent to the civilian dentist in town, four men go twice weekly to another dentist. On the day of the visit; 3 patients were at Bad Lausick, 2 at Wurzen, 2 at Wahren and 3 in different hospitals. The general state of health is said to be good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

The Man of Confidence stated that the clothing situation "could be better".

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is sent out every week.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct

 

XI. CANTEEN:

Small supplies come in regularly from the Stalag.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

Due to the transport difficulties, this camp has only been visited once by the Stalag chaplain, Capt. Chadwick.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

Recreation facilities are good.

 

XIV. MAIL

Mail is slow and rare.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

There were no complaints

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.271, Leipzig West

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 14th, 1945

Man of Confidence: L/Bdr. W.K.Clark POW No. 253801

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp lies in an hotel building near the König Albert Park. There are no military targets near it. The air-raid shelters in the cellar of the building are inadequate and even dangerous and it was, therefore, arranged that in future, the prisoners will be allowed to leave the camp and go to trenches in the nearby park.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

89 British POWs, including 9 Cypriots. They work 9 hours a day for the gas-work. No Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

The prisoners are accommodated in a large room with double-tier beds. Enough sitting accommodation is provided for all of them. Lighting is good. The central heating was stopped when the coal ran out.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

The German Authorities were asked to .install more taps as the two in use were considered insufficient for 90 men. This was promised.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

In order

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Two prisoners work in the kitchen. No complaints. There are no Red Cross parcels in stock.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick parade is held twice weekly by Capt. Webster at the revier in Leipzig. There is no recognised sanitator in the camp. A very small supply of drugs and medicaments is at hand. Dental treatment is given by a civilian dentist in the town.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

The boot situation is bad as no material for repairing old boots is available in Leipzig.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is sent out regularly.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No canteen.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

There are good facilities for recreation and entertainment in this camp.

 

XIV. MAIL

Mail from South Africa is reported to be very slow at the moment.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

Some minor points were settled on the spot.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

Satisfactory.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.57, Altenhain.

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 14th, 1945

Man of Confidence: Bdr. R. Barber, POW No. 249278

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The camp consists of a wooden barrack in a compound. Open slit trenches were built by the POWs; 700 yards east of the camp there is an underground ammunition depot.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

81 British prisoners working 8-10 hours daily in a stone quarry. No Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

One largo room furnished with double and triple tier beds and chairs and tables. The prisoners have 2-3 blankets each. Good lighting. Two stoves with sufficient fuel assure good heating.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES

Satisfactory.

 

V . TOILET FACILITIES:

Good.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Food is cooked by the prisoners in a well equipped kitchen. Good store-room for Red Cross parcels.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Sick parade twice weekly by a Russian doctor at Brandis. Serious cases are sent to Wurzen. There is no recognised orderly in the camp. Dental treatment by a civilian dentist at Polensk is reported to be good.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

In order, apart from the poor state of the boots.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Laundry is sent out and takes a long time before being returned.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

Small supply from the stalag.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

The camp is well supplied with books and games.

 

XIV. MAIL

Mail is slow.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

Several cases of ill-treatment were reported, committed by the Kommando-führer. Upon request of the Delegate of the Protecting Power this man will be changed immediately.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

This camp may be described as adequate.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.39/36, Trebsen.

BRITISH

Date of visit: March 14th, 1945

Man of Confidence: L/Cpl. George Blues, POW No. 11935

 

I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

This camp is formed by a large barrack of nine rooms surrounded by a large compound. There are no military targets. The shelters are still under construction.

 

II. CAPACITY AND PRESENT PERSONNEL:

100 British POWs, including 15 Non-Commissioned Officers who volunteered for work do surface work in a coal mine, 9 hours daily. As a rule there is no Sunday work.

 

III. INTERIOR ARRANGEMENTS

All nine rooms are used as sleeping as well as dining-rooms. Good lighting and heating facilities. Each man has 2 blankets.

 

IV. WASHING AND BATHING FACILITIES:

Good.

 

V. TOILET FACILITIES:

Good.

 

VI. FOOD AND COOKING:

Food is cooked in the factory kitchen. The rations are controlled by the Man of Confidence and are according to scale. Red Cross parcels can be stored outside the camp and the Man of Confidence will be given a key to the room. At the moment there are no stocks.

 

VII. MEDICAL ATTENTION AND SICKNESS:

Patients are sent twice a week to a doctor. The recognised sanitator looks after the lighter cases in the camp. There are no medical supplies but a small quantity is to be found in the guard's room.

 

VIII. CLOTHING

The clothing situation is not very good at the moment. This is partly due to the non-existence of a stock at the Stalag and partly to the fact that the Germans are not able to supply any good clothing.

 

IX. LAUNDRY

Sent out.

 

X. MONEY AND PAY

Correct.

 

XI. CANTEEN:

No canteen.

 

XII. RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY:

None.

 

XIII. RECREATION .AND EXERCISE:

The Chief Man of Confidence was informed that books and games are most needed in the camp. Outdoor recreation facilities are good.

 

XIV. MAIL

Very slow.

 

XV. WELFARE WORK

Nothing to report.

 

XVI COMPLAINTS:

Some minor points were settled on the spot when discussing them with the German officer in charge of the camp.

 

XVII. GENERAL IMPRESSION:

A favourable impression was gained of this camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No.104, Rittwitz.

BRITISH

Date of interview: March 14th, 1945.

Man of Confidence: Signalman J.L. George POW No. 275521 (interviewed at Grossweitschen)

 

Strength of Camp: 20 men no orderly.

 

Nature of work: Work in a stone-quarry, 9 hours daily. As a rule Sundays are free.

 

Air-raid precautions: POWs can go to a collar. There are no military targets. Shelter is provided in a school about 200 yards away. The POWs would prefer slit trenches. No military target. The prisoners will be allowed to construct trenches themselves.

 

Medical attention: Sick parade thrice weekly by a French doctor. For dental treatment the men go to the local dentist.

 

Parcels: Parcels have been kept in a room outside the camp where civilians also had entrance, but the Delegate of the Protecting Power arranged that parcels will be kept separate in future.

 

Fuel: POWs state that they have not received any - coal rations this year. For heating purposes they are dependent on the fuel they can steal from their working place.

 

Complaints: 1) As these prisoners have not received any letter-cards for 6 weeks, these forms will be given to them in addition to the ones due now when supplies arrive from the Stalag. 2) POWs asked to have their photographs taken. A photographer will be allowed to visit the camp.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No. 227, Hartha

BRITISH

Man of Confidence: L/Cpl. A. P. Woods, POW No. 228875 (Interview at Kriebethal)

 

Strength of Camp: 25

 

Nature of work: Loading and unloading railway wagons. Approx. 8 working hours daily. No Sunday work at present although only 1 Sunday in three is free.

 

Air-raid precautions: No proper shelters at present; the shelter used until now is full of evacuees. No military target. The POWs will be allowed to build slit trenches.

 

Medical attention: Sick parade at Döbeln 3 times a week by a French doctor. Dental treatment from a civilian dentist in the town. First aid box in the camp.

 

Parcels: Kept in a safe room in a nearby school. Until now the German guard kept both keys but the Man of Confidence will be given one now.

 

Fuel: No official wood or coal issue. POWs do not go short of coal, however, since they unload it during working hours and take enough home with them.

 

Complaints: No complaints.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No. 727, Zuckerfabrick Döbeln

American

Man of Confidence: P.F.C. Max Gendelman, POW No. 318403 (interview at Gross-weitschen)

 

Strength of Camp: 51 men.

 

Nature of work: Loading wagons in the sugar works, 8 hours daily, no Sunday work.

 

Air-raid precautions: Open trenches. No military target

 

Medical attention: Some difficulties in seeing a doctor. Dental treatment in order. Supply of drugs in camp.

 

Parcels: No stocks.

 

Fuel: As much as wanted.

 

Complaints: 1) Until now the washroom was closed on Saturdays in the afternoon and on Sunday morning so that POWs had no possibilities of washing or shaving. From now on this room will be opened when the POWs are in the camp. 2) 13 men working as a so-called "loading party" have not been allowed to leave their working place when the alarm is sounded. The Delegate arranged that these POWs will be able to seek shelter when the "Deckungs-alarm" is sounded. This "Deckungs-alarm" is sounded directly by the firm and only then when the planes are over the factory and when there is real danger. 3) Some minor points were also discussed and settled to the satisfaction of the prisoners.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No. 153, Carsdorf

American

Man of Confidence: P.F.C., Charles J. Rudolph, POW No. 318937 (interview at Leipzig. Camp only opened three weeks ago)

 

Strength of Camp: 100 men. No orderly.

 

Nature of work: Railroad work. 10-11 hours daily. Sundays generally free.

 

Air-raid precautions: Covered shelters. In order.

 

Medical attention: Serious cases go to the revier at Borna, otherwise treatment from a German civilian doctor at Pegua. German guard has First Aid box.

 

Parcels: No parcels.

 

Fuel: POWs are only allowed to have a fire at night. Fuel ration adequate.

 

Complaints: 1.) The Man of Confidence had no ration scale but one will now be given to him. 2) Medical attention: As the POWs have had some difficulties in reporting sick and getting to see the doctor, the Delegate informed the Stalag doctor about this case and asked to have the necessary steps taken. No further complaints.

 

 

 

Working Detachment No. 118, Leipzig North

American

Man of Confidence: P.F.C. Robert A. Stevenson, POW No. 314083 (Interview at Leipzig)

 

Strength of Camp: 94 men. No orderly.

 

Nature of work: Railway work, 9-11 hours daily, as a rule Sundays free. Air-raid precautions: In order. No military target near the camp.

 

Medical attention: British doctor at revier at Leipzig. In order. Facilities are given to see a German dentist.

 

Parcels: No parcels issued since 17th January 1945. Parcels are kept in the central magazine for the whole district.

 

Fuel: In order.

 

Complaints: Some smaller requests were settled on the spot.

 

 

Sig. Fritz Dasen.

 

Thanks to Paul Forden for this report.